Monday, April 27, 2015

Contemplative Monday


The following is from 'The Pocket Thich Nhat Hanh' (click)
and published by 'Shambhala Pocket Classics'.

Beyond Birth and Death


"It is our idea of birth and death that takes away our peace and happiness in everyday life.


And it is meditation that will rid us of the fear that is born from the idea of birth and death.


This is the  virtue of deep looking in meditation.


It helps you to see the heart of reality very deeply.


To touch the nature of interbeing is to touch the very nature of no-death and no-birth."



10 comments:

  1. Birth and death, they deserve deep thoughts, and when a loved one leaves, we wonder, have they really gone, or are just over the horizon, like a ship leaving port? Hope all in your family have each-other close by right now, hugs from way down south.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Huge questions, Jean, and we work on the answers in many different ways. I think and hope everyone finds/believes things in their lifetime that will give them their answers.

      Delete
  2. A friend and former colleague was recently killed in a horrific accident when a tree fell on her car. She was a wonderful musician and a brilliant teacher who got the most out of even the most reluctant students. It's really hard for me to understand why someone who positively affected so many others should have met such a terrible fate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So sorry to hear this, Pat. It is very difficult to understand why this would happen to your friend.
      Take care.

      Delete
  3. A neighbor of ours died of cancer about ten days ago ~ so sad because he was only 68. For some reason it hit really hard. Death is the big unknown, isn't it? Sometimes I feel my loved ones no longer exist and are gone forever; other times I feel them close by. It's a mystery to me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember you mentioned this, Louise. I do understand what you said about sometimes feeling closer to your deceased loved ones than you do other times. I think it's because we will always be 'connected' to our family/ancestors due to genetics. We are here because they were/are here in us. We are them in some part, I think. Sure we create our own identity/character throughout our life but we also take them along for the ride. We have no choice.
      I think we humans have made far too much about death. It happens and we ought to get along with living.

      Delete
  4. I'm curious - What are your thoughts on this, Jim?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well Sharon, I have always had a fear of dying. I remember being taken to my grandmother's funeral at age 5. I saw her there and all the relatives crying and upset. I was too young to understand what was going on. Why I was there still confounds me.
      The past 15 or so years I have been reading and learning more about Buddhism and their feelings about life/death. Luckily for me and many others, we have a Buddhist temple here in the city......the Shambhala Buddhists who came here in the 80's from Colorado. They liked the life-style here in Nova Scotia.I attended meditation classes for a while to get me started. I am not a Buddhist. Nor am I a Christian. I am someone who is looking for a reasonable answer to all those questions we humans have been asking for millennium.
      What Thich Nhat Hanh is saying here, in my opinion, is that all sentient beings (everything that is conscious) are inter-connected and come from the same source. Some people call that source God and others may call it Energy from which the universe began. Whatever one may call it, all things depend on one another to survive and live.
      Those birds you are so enjoying at your feeders, Sharon, come from the same life-source as we do and so on up and down the 'food chain'.
      When someone/something stops living in it's physical form, it continues to 'live' and becomes part of the whole once again. So it (call it the soul if you wish) never dies and therefore things are never born (birth) because they (the whole cosmos) never die. Physical bodies cease to exist but the 'energy' stays and goes into the 'BIG MIX' to contribute in whatever way it may, to continue 'life'.

      YIKES!! This was a long answer. This is where I am personally right now with life and death. It works for me better than anything else I have practiced and/or considered.

      Delete
  5. I'm late reading your post, sorry Jim. I think that I'm realistic when it comes to death... natural life cycle etc. But I do think that it takes personal experiences to bring out your true perspective. My Dad died too young, at 68, but what really made me come to terms with my own raw emotions was a serious heart attack Clive had 15 years ago. His heart stopped but they got it going again. I was in the waiting area when a doctor and priest came out and called my name and I can recall thinking "Oh my God, he's gone"! He hadn't, but they thought that a religious presence would help me given the seriousness of the incident - it didn't, all it did was almost cause my own death! But since then I've had a much more realistic view of death and dying. The incident helped me in a way I would never have dreamed of. I know that you guys can relate with this too.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Agreed 100%...A Soul Can't die and the photos your taking show the strength and beauty of that Truth, bravo Jim

    ReplyDelete

Hey, I really like your comments and appreciate the time you took to do so.

Related Posts with Thumbnails