Thursday, April 9, 2015

Just Curious


Question: Does anyone know why a few coniferous trees 
do not lose the leaves till spring arrives?


This is a young Beech tree at the park, and by the looks of it
it still has all its leaves......albeit, dried up.

I know Oak trees can do this as well.
Our two Beeches don't lose their leaves till their buds start forming.

Sophie is pondering this very difficult question.......
until she saw a dog and ran off!!




21 comments:

  1. The colors in this are gorgeous. Love seeing these shots of Sophie and aren't dogs just so fickle when something piques their interest!!!

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    Replies
    1. It can be a woman or a dog, Jeanne, that piques her attention, but mostly women!

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  2. lol Sophie makes me smile. when we moved here to the woods full of oaks and hickory that was one of the first things that was a puzzle for me-why don't the oak leaves drop most of their leaves before the new buds-that is interesting

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    Replies
    1. Now you can find out the answer, Kathy.....just 2 comments below this.

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  3. I was once told it was because they were selfish. But when I lived in the woods in Connecticut, I decided that just had a cruel sense of humour. You'd finish raking. Another tree would dump its load. You'd rake those... and another...

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    1. All part of the evolutionary process, Mitchell, at least according to article mentioned right below your comment.
      You are probably right though, they are selfish but for totally different reasons. LOL

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  4. marcescence. Some deciduous trees have this trait. I have a few Oak trees ( non-native) that persist to January. Those leaves hold on through some pretty stiff wind.

    good article here

    http://northernwoodlands.org/articles/article/why-do-some-leaves-persist-on-beech-and-oak-trees-well-into-winter

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    Replies
    1. Marti, thanks for this. I can always depend on your vast knowledge of flora and fauna in nature.

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    2. Just read the article and it fully explains why these trees do what they do. Thanks so much.

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  5. I have no clue but I read the marcescence article -- fascinating!

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    Replies
    1. But Debra, now you do. Good article eh?

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  6. hmmm all I know is evergreens never change but there is one small chance when Autumn comes it smells heavenly????

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    1. I LOVE the smell of evergreens too, Lorraine.

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  7. Sophie and the beech almost match in colour! We have a beech hedge and it's the same. The dry leaves hang on for grim death until spring.

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    Replies
    1. After reading the above article mentioned, those dry leaves may just be saving the tree's life, Craig.

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  8. i have several trees that hang on to their leaves through winter too. you still have snow? it is 73 here today!

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    1. 73!!! If it wasn't our 'lucky number', I would be so JEALOUS!! lol
      The article above mentioned by Upopaepops is very good, Joyce, you may like it.

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  9. Great question, Jim! I've been reading some articles on-line about it, including the link your friend posted above. There are also conifers that drop all their needles in the fall" tamaracks and larches. So are they just a little beyond other conifers and on their way to eventually evolving into deciduous trees? I have no clue, because the two main types of trees have responded to environmental challenges in very different ways. Fascinating to think about! Have a good one!

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Hey, I really like your comments and appreciate the time you took to do so.

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