Friday, November 8, 2013

Getting To Know Me


I was brought up a Roman Catholic at a time 
when we learned that there was a right way
and a wrong to think, feel, act and do things,

I loved my 'faith' during this time of my life......up to about the age of 18.

Then I started to have questions....ones that my parents weren't comfortable with.
Like, what about the other faiths in the world? Are they all wasting their time?
How and why did we get here (other than the biological way)?
Did a God really do all of this? And questions along this 
existentialist path.

Funny thing is I really started 'questioning' things and was encouraged to do so
during my first years in university. It was run by the Jesuits, a Roman Catholic order.
Turns out they were very liberal minded and wanted us to question everything!

So I did....and much to my mother's chagrin!

The 'rest' is history.
Here I am on a weekly basis 'pushing' the views/teachings of a Buddhist nun, 
reading everything I can get my hands on about Buddhist philosophy and thought.

Yet I am not a Buddhist. I simply have found a 'way' that makes more sense to me
as to how we got here and suggests ways to make this journey through life
more bearable, happy and fulfilling.

Yes I have been flying Tibetan prayer flags on my property for years. 
Am I a wannabe Buddhist?
No.
I am just a human being with his eyes and ears wide open
and listening to what everyone has to say.
And one that has found a philosophy that works for him.

The aforementioned Tibetan prayer flags 
that have been 'enhanced' to brighten up a dreary November day here in the Maritimes.





27 comments:

  1. Although I didn't grow up with a strong sense of religion, my views have changed drastically over the years as well.

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    1. I guess, Nancy, that's what growing up is all about....developing values on our own along the way.

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  2. Part of life, this questioning. I love your prayer flags, and think that there are many ideas , from many religions that can be so instrumental in making your own faith version meaningful to you! Great post.

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    1. Very true Jeanne. That is exactly what I have done. I cherish the values that I learned as a child and introduce them to my new-found ones. They appear to like each other.

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  3. I was born Catholic, but eventually you start looking around and seeing and wondering, living, reading, researching, feeling...I know that all religions are good I also learned, and know that God or Buddha or...
    Others, are highly spiritual beings who have created a place where only Love Is, we call it Heaven, and the loving spirits together in love is God...So God is Love and Heaven is where LOVE lives...and no soul is ever lost...

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    1. Very well said Lorraine. That is it in a nutshell! Thanks.

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  4. Thank you for sharing this with us. I was also brought up catholic. However, for most of my life I did not attend any church (I also find Buddhism very interesting).
    For 5 years now, I have been an agnostic Anglican! I like the people in the parish we go to and the hymn singing and so my partner and I regularly attend church although I do not believe.

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    1. An agnostic Anglican...you can start your own religion, Alain!! I am sure a lot of people attend 'services' for peace it may give them. Walking into a church I always feel a sense of peace.

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  5. Thank you for sharing this, Jim. I was also raised Catholic, and if someone asked me right now what my religion is, I'd probably still say Catholic. However, since my in-laws passed away back in March, we have been attending my mother-in-law's church, which is Evangelical. For the longest time, I felt like I was "cheating" on my church every Sunday, as I sat through the service.

    It's been 8 months now, and I've really come to love this church. I've slowly become more and more involved, even volunteering for different events. I'm actually waiting to find out if I'll be doing their books. Crazy, huh?

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    1. Must be a good 'fit' Lisa. funny how things happen,eh?

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  6. I grew up in a religious (Christian) home; we went to church regularly and I even attended Sunday school. And like you, I started to question things. But even earlier. Around the age of 12 or so. I'm also more aligned with Buddhism thought and philosophy even though I'm not a Buddhist. There are a lot of things that I like about it. There is no organized religion that I like completely. I prefer to be an independent...LOL I'm more spiritual than religious.

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    1. Very similar upbringings, Martha. I too figured out that you can be spiritual with attaching to an organized religion.

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  7. I'm glad I was not brought up in a religious family, leaving me to search and learn by myself.

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    1. I hear you Inger! Religion can be very crippling if one isn't careful. On the other hand, there is a lot to gain from the worlds religions as well.

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  8. we are so very much alike. Not sure if that's good or bad but I think it is what we are supposed to do...question.

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    1. Joanne, it is neither good nor bad. It is what it is and we are what we are.....inquisitive people. I have been known to 'drive someone to distraction' with all my questions!! lol

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  9. I think I need some Tibetan prayer flags. It feels so good to have a belief system that works.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. I think you do too, Janie! The symbolism behind them is very compassionate and kind.

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    2. I like compassionate and kind. That's you and Ron.

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  10. Questions. Now that will get you into trouble every time.
    I love my Tibetan prayer flags too. Which also push the limits to what I was taught as a child.
    A very strict teaching that would have 99% of humans burning in Hell. Especially Catholics.
    In my business, I have learned a respect for all faiths and non-faiths.
    Being open to yet unknown ideas is the only way for this mixed up American to fly.

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    1. |Funny we were told that 'all other religious sects' would spend eternity in purgatory!
      Stew, you are far from being mixed up, sir.

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  11. I like the way you processed this colorful image.

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    1. Thanks Pat. Those flags are so faded now after 3 years out in the elements, they needed a boost!

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  12. Hi Y'all,

    A very dear friend of my Humans suffered with cancer for 5 years before succumbing. She found solace in Buddhism during this period. While some of her friends ridiculed her for seeking comfort and understanding in life, a few of her friends stood by her. My Human attended her memorial service carried out by a Buddhist nun. My Human once said to me, that she felt she could have been in any church in America that teaches about love.

    My Human told her niece once, that life style and religion, since no one knows what is truly beyond or how the Universe actually began, is whatever brings comfort to the worshiper.

    But what do I know? I'm a dog and I don't really understand prayer or what the Humans do when they go to church, or why they go.

    Y'all come by now,
    Hawk aka BrownDog

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    1. I guess we are lucky if we find peace at all. And if it's a church, mosque, synagogue, temple or shrine room then so be it.
      You are correct, Hawk, it's all about love.
      Good to see you and thanks for dropping by.

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  13. I went to a benedictine college so I know how you feel. I'm also proud of it. (and I'm familiar with the Jesuits). I'm Catholic... more or less. I disagree with the party line on a few things... like us being intrinsicly disordered (whatever that means). And I've had my share of doubts. What person of faith hasn't? The church doesn't seem to be hostile to other faiths these days. I don't believe that the Christian should consider him or herself superior to other people. More or less Catholic means that I still attend Catholic church and follow along with what's going on institutionally. I flirt with the Episcopaleans on occasion. Pope Francis is an inspiration. He's demonstrative and behaves the way I like to think Jesus would.

    I see a lot of similarities between Christianity and Buddhism like the idea of suffering in this life... vices and virtues, etc.

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    1. Hey Coop, good to see you! Each of us finds meaning wherever it feels comfortable and rewarding. I must admit I still have concerns with a few teachings of the RC church in particular, but I too am very pleased with their selection of Pope Francis.......an evolution just may have started!!
      I believe when one gets down to it, there are many similarities between most 'faiths'.....the basics that is.

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