Thursday, July 18, 2013

Barking Up The Wrong Tree?


For the past week or so I have been 'experimenting' with my camera.
My Nikon D90 has a setting called 'Raw'.


I am just learning about it and have discovered that the 
end results, the photos taken, are pretty close to what 
one sees when taking the photos.


Most people with cameras like this set them on what is called
JPEG......which allows the camera to slightly change
the image to make it 'fuller' with colour saturation,
and I am sure much more.


I am finding, especially with these images of the trunk
of a pine tree, that the results appear sharper and cleaner
and the colours seem thinner, not as saturated.


I have also learned that most professional photographers
use 'raw' initially and then edit afterwards as needed, if at all.


So far I like the results I am getting in that if I feel they need
any editing to enhance or exaggerate what I am looking for,
I will do so. If not they stay as they are like these ones.


So much to learn!




23 comments:

  1. I agree Jim - lovely natural images. Some shots need a "punch" but many don't, these being a case in point. There is so much to learn with DSLR's so I'm going to start attending our village camera club when it starts at the end of summer - hopefully I can learn from other, smarter people!

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    1. Good idea Craig. Many years ago I took a 'course' at UBC in Vancouver. It was very helpful to get the instructor's and the other students' opinions and view points. Hey, you are 'smart' to do this.

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  2. The RAW format certainly has its advantages
    but since I am in a mood to reinterpret everything I see,
    the JPEG is fine with me, giving me a good start for my photoshop,
    to repaint the world as I see fit.
    You've made a good demonstration here though.
    It looks great!!
    :)~
    HUGZ

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    Replies
    1. And Bruno, you do it so well! We could all learn from you, monsieur.
      That is what I like about about photography....there is so much potential as to how far you want to take a photo.
      Thanks.

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    2. Knowing when to stop in modified photography
      is as primordial as in painting...
      I may sometimes go overboard,
      but who cares???
      :D~
      HUGZ

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  3. Beautiful. When I used a pro for photos of my jewelry (business), I never understand what was meant by raw. Thanks for the lesson!

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    1. Hi Mitchell! Good to see you this bright sunny morning! Glad you cleared THAT up ()!!!
      Any time.

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  4. I use jpg only because it's quicker -- many of the editing softwares don't recognize raw photos, but they are much better. Thanks for the info Jim!

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    1. That is good to know Nancy, thanks.

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  5. RAW -- sounds like a porn video. Not that you would take those kind of photos!

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  6. When saving images in Raw format, you always have exactly what the chip recorded, probably the best if you plan to do further processing and print the image. JPEG does save time and space though.

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    Replies
    1. I am discovering that now Pat. Takes longer to download from camera and from Picasa to blogger. Thanks for this.

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  7. You do know that I have NO idea what I am shooting "in". I still mostly shoot as if it is a point and shoot. LOL!
    I love the distinction between the two trees - nice study!

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    Replies
    1. Yes I know that Sharon!! But it doesn't matter....you can't know everything. And now that you are establishing yourself as a writer, I'd say stick with this!!
      You noticed! It created a strange effect....one I wasn't sure what it would look like. Looks like a strip of tree is out of focus but it is an actual separate tree.

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  8. Beautiful, Jim...lovely green hues.

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  9. My photography teacher is still wondering why I haven't switched to RAW format. There are more colours captured, and the images are much higher quality. But he's a professional; I'm not. JPEG format works fine for now. But I would like to try RAW to see the difference. My camera (probably yours, too) has a setting that will take two photos of the same shot, one in JPEG, on in RAW, so I can compare, so I don't have any excuse not to at least experiment! The only real downside is that RAW images are much larger and take up more space on your hard drive. If you have lots of space to spare, no problem. But if you don't, that's another story!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for this Martha! Fills in some of the spaces for me.

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  10. I loved these-it is amazing what all the new cameras can do now

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    1. It sure is Kathy! Not that long ago that we had to wait and wait for the 'end results'!

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  11. THE PURPOSE OF SETTING your camera on RAW is that it is much more fixable or changeable in photoshop or whatever your processing method is that jpeg is. It also takes up much much more memory on your card and in your computer.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for this Jeanne. I do find that with RAW the whole editing process is more flexible. And yes, I will very soon have to download a ton of photos on the external hard-drive.

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