Thursday, June 13, 2013

One Crow, Two Crows.......


Ever hear the 'counting crows' rhyme?

Whenever I see a crow or a 'murder' of them I think of this rhyme.
This is how it goes:


One crow sorrow,


Two crows joy,


Three crows a letter,

Four crows a boy,

Five crows for silver,

Six crows for gold,

Seven crows for a secret never to be told.

Eight crows for a wish,

Nine crows for a kiss,

And ten crows for a time of joyous bliss.


So according to this poem I will be receiving a letter soon.

I guess whatever number of crows you see in total 
that is what you use to 'see your present or near future'.

Sometimes it is a bit unnerving how accurate this can be.

The morning Ron's mother died I looked out her dining room window
and saw a solitary crow sitting on a tree branch.....not another in sight.

Do you have a version of this? 
I know they can vary from place to place.









24 comments:

  1. As old as I am, I'm surprised I have never heard this rhyme. Love it and your images Jim.

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    1. Probably an 'eastern' thing, Nancy, originating from England maybe.
      I loved the Iris photo today on your post!!

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  2. I've never heard this rhyme before. It's pretty good! I really like crows. They fascinate me, and they are extremely intelligent.

    That's pretty freaky about the solitary crow you saw when Ron's mom passed away!

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    1. Me too Martha! I think crows are very bright and fun to watch.
      It was strange to see the one crow that morning.

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  3. I'd never heard of this, Jim, but there is something that concerns a type of moth that is similar. After we'd gone to my niece's funeral in Texas, we returned to Hawaii. The next day, it was like a swarm of moths in our house -- they were HUGE -- flying all over the house, but especially to the room where my niece had slept when she visited us, then swarming down the stairs and encircling me. Needless to say, I was VERY wide-eyed. Then the moths left, never to return again. My Chinese-American neighbors told me this moth only appeared after someone had died -- to someone this person had loved.

    Some of this stuff has no rational explanation so one can't help but wonder.

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    1. I can imagine you would be wide-eyed, Kitty!! WOW! That must have been very astounding to witness.

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  4. That rhyme is new to me....and these photos are beautiful in my eyes! :)

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    1. Any crows in Montreal Linda? Thanks for stopping by and have a great weekend.

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  5. Must be crow week. We had a immature crow land/hop on our back porch and spend the day with us. How my cats didn't catch and kill him is beyond me, he must have been one lucky crow :)

    He was so cute with his blue eyes and adorable call for his family who eventually came and retrieved him. Two crows joy!! I'll take it Jim.... Poor fellow must have tried out his wings a bit to soon. My cat Cheetah just sat by the window watching him, but didn't bother him, the other two lazy cats slept thru the whole thing!! lucky for him...

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    1. Phew! That was a close one, Jen!! Hey, two crows joy! There you go kiddo! have a good weekend Jen.

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  6. I've never heard this before. It's interesting. My mom said that deaths always come in threes. When my dad died, a neighbor had just died, and another neighbor died a few days later.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. I have heard that one as well Janie. 'Bad' things come in threes.

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  7. I love to watch crows. They are so intelligent, but oh, so wary. They seldom come very close.
    I like the rhyme.

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    1. They are very interesting to watch, I agree Pat. They ARE so wary and very calculating.

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  8. Jim, I've never heard this before, either. Crows freak me out, as do most birds (thank you, Mr. Hitchcock!) but those photos were great. Just like ALL your photos!

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    1. Oh you say that to all the guys, Lisa!! lol Thanks.
      Afraid of birds,eh? Too bad. There must be some kind of antidote to cure this.

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  9. Hi Jim! As a fellow Bluenoser, I have heard this exact rhyme from my Smith's Cove ancestors countless times. It can be uncannily accurate. Although in recent years, because of West Nile Virus, it's been hard to spot one crow ~ which I would have welcomed sorrow just to see a crow. I've spotted the rare joy recently. They're beginning to return. I'm longing for a big rowdy flock! I've seen in the past very distraught flocks of crows cawing over a fallen crow. They are wilely and fascinating creatures. Loved this post! Hope all is well with the trinity!

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    1. It was certainly in the Valley, Louise because I learned it from Ron. He grew up with this rhyme.There are lots of crows here. Hear them every morning around the same time....not bothersome at all. They are very bright creatures with a great memory I hear.
      All is well with us. Thanks. Have a good weekend.

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  10. I have never heard that rhyme but I like it! Sounds old-fashioned and it appeals to memories of my childhood. Lots of crows in Oklahoma...I better start counting! No, I didn't just say that...Counting Crows, hahaha!

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    1. I never thought of that , Liz! Maybe so.

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  11. Oh, wait...is this rhyme where the group got its name?

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  12. We have the same rhyme in England but for magpies...Nice lush shots!

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    1. And from there to the 'new world'....makes sense to me, Fiona!

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  13. I love crows but have not heard of this rhyme before-this spring we had crows visitng off and on mostly a pair

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