Monday, October 29, 2012

Contemplative Monday


WORKING WITH ANGER
...taken from 'Heart Advice--Weekly Quotes From Pema Chodron


"How do we develop the willingness to not retaliate? Shantideva's approach is based on


developing tenderness for the human predicament, and, if that's not possible, 


to at least realize that anger increases our suffering. It is like eating poison seeds and wondering why we get sicker.


To interrupt anger's momentum, he suggests these contemplations on the futility


of our habitual responses. Ask yourself once again: Why do I get angry at people 


and not inanimate things? How much of my anger is caused by fixed views of good and bad,


right and wrong? And couldn't I have some tolerance for others who, just like me,


keep creating their own misery? The real culprits are the kleshas (click) themselves, 


and couldn't we all use some compassionate guidance in working with them?"





29 comments:

  1. You are still there, safe and sound I hope, Love your words, and they shouild be read with much care and thought. Fond greetings, Jean.

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    1. I agree Jean. I re-read Pema's words over and over and get something new each time.
      We are all safe and sound here. 'Sandy' is too far from us to cause too much damage.

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  2. That is so true. I once read that 'anger is like taking poison and expecting the other person to die'. It really stuck in my mind and is what you are saying here. Wise words indeed, and beautiful pictures ... they look like paintings and everything!

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    1. Good point Annie! Anger can do strange and dangerous things to us all if we let it.
      Amazing what one can do with photo-editing now. It's all so new to me and I like to play around with it to create something different.

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  3. So true, Jim. Anger is a very debilitating emotion. It exhausts the body and mind. It’s best to let it go, or you risk sacrificing your happiness. Lovely images, by the way. Very artistic!

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    1. As much as it, anger, may have it's place, I believe it's the extent to which we use it that can make a difference as to how debilitating it is. Did that make sense?
      Have you started to 'play' with some or any of your photos with editing, Martha?

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    2. Just a few, but I am starting to play with some images. I expect I'll have more time for that during the worst of the winter days when we're stuck indoors.

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  4. Good morning Jim. This is how my anger rolls: I get angry at an inanimate thing... for example.. the bottle or package that I am trying to open (because the arthritis in my hands make it very difficult to open) because it's sealed and double sealed so that not one person can tamper with its content. THEN I get angry with the person who tainted the tylenol that time... prompting the extremely overly careful packaging that makes it dangerous for people like me to open packages or bottles or whatever. (because I'll use a sharp knife or whatever else I can find to get into the package.. ) So. To sum it up. First I'm angry at the object. Then, the person behind the object... I guess I am needing therapy, right?

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    1. Welcome to the 'club', Bobbi!

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    2. Yah, Bobbi, why can't they come up with anti-arthritic packaging - if DH is gone there are some things I simply cannot open. Like the easy open lunch meat packs. I cannot grip to get them open they are sealed so tight. And jars - even my rubber jar opening thing is useless in my hands.

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  5. Oh, I get angry at lots of inanimate things. Swearing at them helps.

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    1. Sure does! Better than the alternative!

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  6. I love the way you processed these images.

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    1. Pat, thanks. I used Picasa's HDR edit. I was looking for something 'edgy' to go along with the topic.

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  7. As usual, Jim, you are the first one I read in the morning. So you get the brunt of my stupidity. Sorry. My brain is not fully functioning. (But I have to start somewhere, right?)

    Anger. I'm quick to anger, it's the nature of this beast. It is the way I process what is wrong. Not a good solution, I'll be the first to admit. Much better (I think) than to be complacent and not give a da.. Then all would be lost. I would never get out of the hole of anger. That would really poison my being.

    Good Morning by the way - is everything alright up there?

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    1. We are doing fine here....a lot of wind and rain on the way. It is more a big Nor'easter than a hurricane here.
      I agree Sharon that anger has it's place in getting one's point across at times....just not good to allow it to eat you alive.

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  8. Jim as usual this is such a timely post. I was reacquainted with a very distasteful person over the weekend. This person is so very disagreeable that she could make a saint angry. Ugh!

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    1. Oh yes, those people! I think they are placed on this earth to 'test' us, Jen! That person must be in a lot of pain to have to feel they must share their suffering.

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    2. good reply......

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  9. Hello Jim,
    Love the pictures, this lesson will be very useful this evening, we have dinner with friends and other entities!!!
    Ivan ;-)

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    1. Thanks Ivan and good luck at dinner!

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  10. I used your link to learn about kleshas. Something to think about.

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    1. Oh those kleshas can be a challenge at times! Can't imagine a life without them though.....maybe that is Nirvana....

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  11. Lovely shots!

    Anger is indeed a hot coal that burns the person bearing it.

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    1. Thanks Fiona. Yes, anger can do a lot of damage if left unchecked.

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  12. Well, "kleshas" is a new word for me, but not a new concept :) I'm just getting it that "Contemplative Monday" is a weekly event. Your post inspired me to look up Pema Chodron and I've now bookmarked her site. I guess I wonder about the possibility of passion and inner peace coexisting. Anyhow, great food for thought. I enjoyed your post and the photography, and will look forward to next Monday's post.

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    1. To me as well, Carol. A new word for an old concept.
      Pema Chodron has helped me a couple of times in the past through difficult situations through her 'lessons'/words. We were fortunate enough to see her in Halifax a couple of years ago at a 'get together' and lesson/practice. Her presence was relaxed and full of humour about our human condition. She has a number of books available.

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  13. "Anger ... like eating poison seeds and wondering why we get sicker." Powerful simile juxtaposed with calming images. Beautiful!

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    1. Thanks Louise. That is what I enjoy about Pema Chodron's writing....powerful through it's simplicity.

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