Thursday, October 31, 2013

Battling It Out For Nova Scotia


Back before both Canada and the United States were independent countries, 
the control of North America was being fought by England and France mostly.


We know the outcome for both the United States and Canada.
The British were booted out of the 13 colonies 
and/so in turn the British kicked out the French here in Canada.

For those interested in more details as far as Nova Scotia fared 
in all this and who originally made up our population here,
you can read through the following information provided by Parks Canada.
I got this last weekend in the Valley where the actual site 
of the 'deportation of the Acadians' took place.

Okay all you 'history buffs'.......















This is the actual site of the 'deportation' we found last Sunday.

One thing, I am happy and feel fortunate that my 
great-great grandfather, Theodore Cuvelier,
arrived in North America from Paris, France in the mid 1800's
after most things were settled between
England and France here in Canada.

Otherwise, I would not be here to tell you all about it!!






19 comments:

  1. Interesting background on where New England's Enhlish sympathizers went after the revolution.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Lisa. Yes, a lot of 'loyalists' moved north and settled in the Maritimes and Ontario. We are more connected than we realize.

      Delete
  2. What well preserved papers, and that cross is so beautiful , I'm sure many, as you are. can be so thankful their relatives arrived in safer times. Cheers, Jean.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was told by a genealogist that my family would be considered to be 'late Acadians' as they arrived after the expulsion. Actually my g-g grandfather stayed in the US, joined the US army for one year, got in some kind of trouble and took off to Nova Scotia!! They are probably still looking for him!! lol
      That cross Jean is very beautifully done and holds a very imposing position there.

      Delete
  3. Many of these deportees went to Louisiana, is that correct?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Marty that is correct. The surnames are the same as those who stayed here but pledged allegiance to the British King.

      Delete
  4. Very historically interesting (although difficult) times. I enjoy learning about the past, and hope we learn from it. Do you have any (distant) relatives in Louisiana?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is possible I may Martha. Just maybe distant relatives may have gotten to North America before my g-g grandfather, who arrived in 1850.

      Delete
  5. What a lovely shot that first one is.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That first shot Fiona is the exact location from where the Acadians were deported. It is a very serene spot.

      Delete
  6. I know someone on the blogs who writes about the Acadians who settled in Louisiana. I will let her know about this interesting post.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Inger, that would be interesting to see. Thanks.

      Delete
  7. Fascinating post, Jim ~ even though I know the history! I have often tried to imagine what it must have been like to be expelled from my home and sent to the swamps of Louisiana. The things humans do to one another! I hope you are having a great day. Hi to SD ~ I miss my four-footed buds!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Louise, just standing in that spot was a very moving experience and one naturally thought about what it was like to be one of Acadians being expelled from their home. As you know, this area in Nova Scotia is very beautiful and prime as far as farming/agriculture goes compared to where they were sent.
      Well then...I'd say it was time to get one of those 'four-legged' buds!!

      Delete
  8. I did not know all that. Thanks for sharing.

    Love,
    Janie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most welcome Janie. It is very interesting and compelling history.

      Delete
  9. Great little history lesson.Beautiful photos of the historic sites.

    ReplyDelete
  10. My Mother's mother was a daughter of Quebec. Her family tree shows arrivals in 1650's. If I remember correctly some moved over the line into Vermont/New Hampshire for a generation then they returned to inhabit all along the St Lawrence.

    ReplyDelete
  11. thank you for the history-I didn't know this-thanks Jim

    ReplyDelete

Hey, I really like your comments and appreciate the time you took to do so.

Related Posts with Thumbnails