Thursday, October 30, 2014

All In A Day's/Port's Work


As Sophie and I turned the corner to go down the hill to the parking lot yesterday at the park,
we found this huge container ship ahead of us docked at the container pier.



Here is some information I found on the 'Marine Traffic' website:

IMO(International Maritime Organization): 9471214
MMSI (Maritime Mobile Service Identity): 428041000
Call Sign: 4XFA            
    Flag: Israel         
         AIS (Automatic Identification System) Type: Cargo                     
     Gross Tonnage: 40542                           
        Deadweight: 50088 t                      
Length x Breadth: 261.01m x 32.25m      
         Year built: 2010                        
Status: Active      
  
Destination: New York
                                  ETA: 2014-10-31   10:00 UTC
Last Known Port: Halifax (CA)    
            Previous Port: Valencia Anch (ES/Spain)
Speed recorded: 16.7/13.7 knots

Just in case you were wondering!





25 comments:

  1. I can see a slow trip ahead, and, like you, I value the information we can find, it all adds to your super photo. Hope they have good weather and safe travel . Jean.

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    1. Very interesting information indeed, Jean. I can imagine the types of sea conditions that they encounter on a regular basis. Not an occupation for weak-stomached folks!

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  2. Great shot Jim and fascinating information with it. I would never have thought to look this up. I love seeing ships like this in the harbor... Well, since I live in Dallas... ;I guess that would be your harbor. Hope you are having a great week!

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    1. My harbour is your harbour, Jeanne.

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  3. Swim out and board it!! That would be the best blog post ever.

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    1. Keith, I always wanted to stow away on one of these ships since I was a child and end up in some far off country.
      Since I have matured, slightly, I would love to get a passage ticket on one (which I have heard you can do on some) and take a million photos and blog about it here!!....till you guys scream for mercy!! lol

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  4. Keith surely you don't want Jim to be found and locked up? I'd miss him horribly, not to mention what it would do to Ron and Sophie, I myself was about to ask is it safe for you to know this Jim? I don't see anything that would get in trouble but I LOVE that you did it, simple yet effective lol

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    1. No worries Lorraine. That childhood dream to stow away on one has evaporated.

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  5. Gross Tonnage: 40542... Not exactly light, is it? Hahaha... What a great find. And I bet this isn't the only image you snapped, hm?

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    1. And just how did you know that. Martha?! lol I have a few more.
      Just to think how each container weighs is boggling enough!

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  6. From sultry Spain to chilly Halifax . . . .

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    1. I would imagine, Debra, that the crew must carry on board a complete four season wardrobe!

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  7. Oh, no. My stuff is going to get to New York four days before me!

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    1. I'll see what I can do, Mitchell!! lol
      Which container was yours?

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    1. I thought so too, Joyce. These 'Zim' cargo ships are here very often and come from all parts of the world.

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  9. Very cool! I didn't know that you could look up info about that. I just finished reading "The Island Doctor" by J. Cameron MacDonald. My cousin John sent it to me, and it was written by the doctor who worked in Freeport in the mid-fifties. His father-in-law, Captain William Traynor, was a harbour pilot in St. John. I didn't realize how tricky it is to get into St. John, but considering it's on the Bay of Fundy, I shouldn't have been surprised. The book devotes a good chapter to the tricky waters of the Bay of Fundy. Captain Traynor and six others were killed on duty when the inbound Fort Avalon ran down the pilot boat in a heavy fog. It was the worst tragedy in the Saint John Harbour Pilot Service (January 14, 1957). Now I look at boats coming and going in harbors a lot differently. I think people take pilot boats for granted and don't consider how important the service is and how dangerous it can be. Of course, the Halifax Explosion has always colored how I look at Halifax's harbor. See one photo, and off I go. But my next book is marine, so maybe I'll be checking out the marine traffic website. Although I don't think they had such a thing in the dangerous, wartime waters of Placentia Bay in !942. Sorry for the bird walk. I can't help myself! LOL! Have a good day, my friend. And keep an eagle eye on Ronnie, okay! Belly rubs to SD!

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    1. I didn't either, Louise, know that this info was available....till I looked. And these ships are actually tracked.....not surprising I guess.
      We took that ferry to Saint John a few times and I can only imagine how tricky it could be considering the tides/sand bars.
      The pilot boats/tug boats are very busy indeed in Halifax Harbour.
      That 'eagle eye' is always on Ron! I told his mother that I would keep an eye on him. Oh, and Soph had her belly rubs by a real massage therapist on Tuesday.

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  10. I don't want to go on a cruise, but if I were to go on a cruise for some reason, the only place I would want to go is Nova Scotia to see the three amigos.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. That is so sweet, Janie! And we three amigos will be right there on the dock waiting!!

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  11. It's so neat to be able to find that info. I've always found these large ships fascinating.

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    1. Pat, I was surprised to find all that detail. The fascination continues with me as well.

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  12. Wow, it's huge! I'm fascinated by those Freighters too, when I was a child living on Kwajalein, they would occasionally pull up to the dock. It seemed like they were as big as our little island.

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    1. You lived in the Marshall Islands, Terry? Wow! Wow! You should do some posts about your past!!!!!

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  13. Terry, how magnificent it must have been to have grown up there!
    Yes they are HUGE and amazing they stay afloat! I know...it's all about physics.

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