Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Tsit-tsit-tsit, tseeee-tsaaay



This little fella is called a Savannah Sparrow.


Early Monday evening I saw him/her flitting around in the grass dunes along the boardwalk.


There is often a lot of bird activity this time of year in the grasses....probably nesting.


I was a little surprised that this one stayed stationary long enough for me to get these photos.


The following information of this Savannah Sparrow is taken from our 'bird bible',


Peterson Field Guides, Eastern Birds by Roger Tory Peterson.


"Passerculus sandwichensis 41/2--53/4" (11--14cm) This streaked open-country sparrow suggests a Song Sparrow, but usually has a yellowish eyebrow stripe, whitish crown stripe, short notched tail, pinker legs.


It may lack the yellowish over the eyes. The tail notch is an aid when flushing sparrows.
Similar Species: Song Sparrow's tail is longer, rounded.


Voice: Song, a dreamy lisping tsit-tsit-tsit, tseeee-tsaaay (last note lower). Note, a light tsip.


Range: Alaska, Canada to Guatemala. Winters to Central America, West Indies
Habitat: Open fields,meadows, salt marshes, prairies, dunes, shores."


There you have it! The Savannah Sparrow. Probably much more than you ever expected to know about this little creature.





20 comments:

  1. for a second I thought he had one very long leg!

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  2. No fair, you tricked me into learning something Wow, you're good!
    m.

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    1. Never too late Mark! And I WAS a teacher.....

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  3. A handsome bird! But . . . . "flushing sparrows"? WTF?

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    1. Me too! Will have to investigate that one!!!

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    2. I googled flushing sparrows and after a bit of clever investigative journalistic endeavour(phew)...I believe it refers to distinguishing one bird from another as in robin and sparrow or one sparrow species from another, particularly important when taking a census.

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  4. What a beautiful little bird! I love the way you caught him perched on that tall stalk of grass.

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    1. I was a bit surprised he stayed around, usually they are very quick to leave. Maybe he/she was distracting us from the nest?

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  5. Cute little bird. Odd that it just sat there for you. Haven't seen one like that here.

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    1. You might in the fall when they return south. I am pretty sure it was being in the 'protective mode'....that's why it stayed.

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  6. So exciting that he sat and posed for you. I always love the way the Peterson guides describe the bird calls. I myself would have recognized him immediately by his tsip and of course his pink legs.

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    1. LOL! For sure! You are so clever Mitch!
      Peterson was the 'man' for birds.

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  7. I'm so blind to all the different kinds of sparrows.
    All I know is, I love them all.
    We accept all birds equally here in our little hamlet.

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    1. As it should be Stew! Who are you? Robin Hood?! (get it, hamlet...) Hey, I try!

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  8. No, that information was perfect. I just wish my sparrows would stay still long enough for me to get a picture. I have no idea what they are, but cute for sure.

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    1. I know! All sparrows look so similar! If it wasn't for the yellow head streaks, this could just be a plain old sparrow.

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  9. Migration is what gets me. Just imagine those little guys flying all those miles.

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    1. Incredible eh? Hey, maybe they pick up a good wind current and 'ride it' all the way! Just like a surfer 'rides' a good wave? You never know!

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  10. Jim- you captured some great photos of your little visitor. I can't believe she stayed there that long. We are bird lovers too-- and I collect vintage bird reference books-- I will look this one up!
    Xo
    Vicki

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Hey, I really like your comments and appreciate the time you took to do so.

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