Friday, July 27, 2012

Typha Latifolia



Or as we call them here in the Northern Hemisphere....The Bullrush (click here).










These Bullrushes are 'coming into their own' down at the beach trail.





20 comments:

  1. Pretty.
    And I hope there's no joke that I'm missing behind this one.
    m.

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    1. Oh, you're safe on this one Mark! Have a great weekend.

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  2. I like it when they go to seed and get all fluffy.

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    1. That's right Debra, they 'burst' open in late fall.....a whole different look from these.

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  3. south of the border we call them cat tails

    they make great winter subjects for photography

    and always a chance for a marsh wren

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    1. Some people call them that around here as well. Red-winged Blackbirds are very common here and live and nest around these Bullrushes.
      Thanks for dropping by today.

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  4. This pretty plant is the starting point of a desert of trouble. This is a dessication machine- it will quadruple water loss from a pond or lake. It is a siltation machine - it will coat the lake or stream bed with enough silt to cut off all connection with the underground water. Lake beds are the usual places for aquifers to be replenished. When you hear of wells running dry, there is a weed choked lake "upstream" to be cleared and dredged. Cattail sloughs do not produce "lake effect" rains. In North Africa, the cattail infestation in Lake Chad is the driving force expanding the Sahara.

    It is also an immense and renewable resource for food, fuel and fiber. Food use is a little tricky, because the plant collects toxins when it can. If grown in clean water and soil, it is an unbeatable food source. Fuel use is safer. There are many options, from ethanol to digester gas to charcoal and even SynGas. Other pretty weeds such as water hyacinth and Phragmites do similar things and can be used in the same ways.

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    1. Thanks for this information SteveK! I was aware that it 'soaked up' and everything else around it but did not know of the benefits this plant provides some people.
      Next to this plant and starting to compete with it is the Purple Lustrife which is relatively new in these parts but nonetheless starting to take a firm grip on parts of the environment.
      Good to meet you.

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  5. Our ditches down here are full of them but they're no match for our daily monsoons! I've always loved cattails but didn't realize they were so harmful yet useful. Ya learn something new every day in blogland!

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    1. Sure do Chris! I kinda knew they could be used for lanterns after being soaked in oil/fuel for a bit.

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  6. Didn't Typha Latifolia live next door to Olita Klenosky in North Woodmere? Oh wait, that was TYRA Latifolia. Typha Latifolia is the disease Olita got that nearly killed her. No wait, that was Typhus... Never mind.

    Pretty pictures.

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    1. How did you know?! Now the secret is out! lol

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  7. excelentes imágenes, hermoso blog!Saludos.

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    1. Thank you Silvina! Good to meet you.

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  8. We call those cat-tails in Alberta.

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    1. Gee, maybe it's just here that we call them Bullrushes. Thanks for dropping by.

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  9. These pictures are lovely--- in my neck of the woods we call them cat tails. They dry beautifully for fall arrangements--

    Xo
    Vicki

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    1. I bet you have to 'catch them' before they BLOW UP! Right, Vicki! I bet they look great in your arrangements too!

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